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The ARHE Equity and Justice in Collegiate Recovery Discussion Series

The Association of Recovery in Higher Education presents: The ARHE Equity and Justice in Collegiate Recovery Discussion Series.

The ARHE Equity and Justice Fellow is facilitating a series of monthly discussion meetings hosted by movement leaders from diverse communities to engage themes of social justice, equity, and inclusion and how these concepts intersect with programming, support, and services for BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and disabled students in recovery from addiction.

We will be hosting these discussion meetings each month starting in March 2021 through March 2022.

If you are interested in hosting a discusison meeting/workshop as part of our series, or if you have any questions or concerns please contact ARHE’s Justice & Equity Fellow, Dharma Mirza, at: dharma.mirza@collegiaterecovery.org

Folks with accessibility questions or accommodations please email us at: dharma.mirza@collegiaterecovery.org

Missed one of our sessions? Live sessions will be recorded and posted for free access.

Previous Sessions

Cultural Adaptations of 12 Step Recovery Programs

Download the presentation slides here.

Presenter Bio:

Dr. Jamison has a PhD in counseling psychology with academic and research interests in multicultural counseling. Dr. Jamison joined the Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies in 2012 and currently serves as an associate professor and faculty coordinator. She has taught Multicultural Counseling courses for both on campus and online students, and conducts group supervision for students on internship. She served as the clinical placements coordinator for 2.5 years. She is a licensed psychologist with the state of Minnesota and also maintains a small private practice. Dr. Jamison specializes in adolescent addiction, vocational issues for recovering individuals, multicultural counseling, and addiction within the LGBTQ community. Prior to joining the Graduate School, Dr. Jamison was a mental health practitioner at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, Plymouth, working with adolescents and adults. She has given numerous lectures and workshops, including at the American Psychological Association annual conference and the National Conference on Addiction Disorders.

Session Description:

We know the original creators of the 12 Step recovery program were largely White, Christian, middle-class men. Since its creation, the program has been adapted for many different populations, including different religions (Buddhism, Islam, atheism) and other marginalized identities (race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, age, and socioeconomic class). This talk will discuss the different experiences people from marginalized populations encounter when working a 12 Step program designed for a privileged population, and different cultural adaptations that have been utilized to address these different experiences.

For the Culturally Competent: Curating Inclusive Spaces for Black Women in Collegiate Recovery

Presenter Bio:

Dr. Smith is an author and CEO of AMS Consulting, LLC as well as an administrator at the Louisiana Board of Regents. Allison has spent the last 10 years working in the field of substance mis/use prevention and recovery in higher education, by implementing statewide programming and policy initiatives.

Allison is a native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana where she received a B.S. in Psychology from Southern University A & M College, and both a Masters of Public Administration and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership, Research & Counseling (Higher Education Administration specialization) from Louisiana State University.

A consistent passion for Allison is addressing diversity, equity, inclusion and access in the world of prevention programming and recovery in higher education – on both the student and staff sides. Through her love of conversation and collaboration, Allison enjoys connecting multiple parties to create innovative yet practical solutions and making “hard” or “difficult” conversations empathetic, informative and actionable to create a more just and equitable world.

Session Description:

This session will focus on the roles of family, religiosity and cultural competence as key functions in advancing the collegiate recovery space for Black women in higher education, particularly on the staff side. Tips for retention, recruitment, and inclusion of Black women in the collegiate recovery field will be discussed.

Recovery, HIV/AIDS, and the Origins of Harm Reduction

To view the recaptioned version, click here.

Download the presentation slides here.

Download the SHARP Pledge here.

Presenter Bio:

Dharmakrishna Mirza (she/her) is the 2020-21 ARHE Justice & Equity Fellow. Dharma attends Oregon State University, studying Public Health, Queer Studies and Medical Humanities. Dharma focuses her work and research on harm reduction, sexual health, addiction, public health equity, and the intersections of behavioral health and marginalized health populations. Dharma informs her work through intersectional, feminist, and decolonial frameworks and draws on her own experiences in navigating health/harm reduction services as an HIV-positive, queer, biracial, transgender woman, Khwaja Sira (Pakistani Third Gender), and former survival sex worker and IV drug user.

Session Description:

In this discussion we will explore issues faced by students in recovery living with HIV/AIDS and how we can better support them. Participants will get education on the basics of HIV and the origins of harm reduction as a response to the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 80’s and 90’s. We will discuss ways to promote HIV prevention in collegiate recovery communities, understand the unique role of HIV-stigma in recovery, and participants will take part in the Student HIV Awareness and Reduction Pledge (S.H.A.R.P.). The SHARP pledge will help to prepare participants to take the knowledge gained from the session and apply it to their campuses, collegiate recovery communities, and in their personal lives.

Understanding Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Collegiate Recovery Using an Intersectional Lens

To view the recaptioned version, click here.

Download the presentation slides here.

Presenter Bio:

Dr Kristine De Jesus is the Founder of The Wellness Cooperative and the Coordinator of Alcohol and Other Drug Program, Montclair State University.

Dr. De Jesus is an author, entrepreneur, and activist. She is co-host of the Engage Recovery: Meeting at the Intersection Podcast and founder of The Wellness Cooperative, a wellness center dedicated to serving BIPOC folx in recovery from Substance Use Disorder. Dr De Jesus attended Rutgers University where she earned a BA in Psychology and Puerto Rican Studies.

She holds a Masters in Organizational Behavior from Alliant International University, and a doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology where she specialized in Cross Cultural and Health Psychology. Dr De Jesus’s area of expertise is recovery, equity, intersectionality and strategies for reducing health disparities.

Session Description:

The Understanding Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Collegiate Recovery Using an Intersectional Lens discussion is focused on creating a working knowledge of how identities, power and privilege inform the development of collegiate recovery programs grounded in equity. This session will use the Wheel of Intersectional Identities ©  tool to help facilitate the discussion and allow participants to begin assessing ways in which their programs could be more diverse, inclusive, and equitable.

Including Trans and Gender Non-Conforming Communities in Collegiate Recovery

To view the recaptioned version, click here.

Download the presentation slides here.

Presenter Bio: 

Dharma Mirza (she/her) is the 2020-21 ARHE Justice & Equity Fellow. Dharma attends Oregon State University, studying Public Health, Queer Studies and Medical Humanities. Dharma focuses her work and research on harm reduction, sexual health, addiction, public health equity, and the intersections of behavioral health and marginalized health populations. Dharma informs her work through intersectional, feminist, and decolonial frameworks and draws on her own experiences in navigating health/harm reduction services as an HIV-positive, queer, biracial transgender woman, Khwaja Sira (Pakistani Third Gender), and former survival sex worker and IV drug user. 

Session Description: 

In this session we will explore issues of gender equity and inclusion and ways that folks can work to make their CRC/CRP more inclusive for trans, gender non-conforming, and gender diverse communities.