Scheduled highlights for #ARHE2021 Conference Day 1 on Monday, June 21st

 

Yoga with Liz
Hosted by The PhoenixLow to Moderate Intensity. Focus on full range of motion and restoration of balance, while connecting movement and breath.

 

Mountain Meditation
Reducing stress, managing anxiety, lengthening your attention span…these are just a few of the benefits of meditation. Start your day with us and join in a 10 minute guided meditation. The purpose of the mountain meditation is to become grounded and access our inner strength and stability when faced with stressful and challenging circumstances. Since this will be an active meditation, we will close the virtual doors at 10:05am EST so as not to disrupt those who are meditating.
ARHE/ARS/AAPG/HECAOD Continuum of Care Keynote

 

What Does Fully Formed Leadership Look Like?
Susan Packard
As a woman and entrepreneur who is in long-term recovery, Susan Packard has experienced fully formed leadership as the former Chief Operating Officer of HGTV and in a variety of other senior roles.
Fully Formed Leaders are those who lead with both left and right-brained aptitudes. They have the technical skills, and the heart skills needed to work with others and to help them grow. I call these transactional, and transformative, skills. Both sets of skills are critical, and the discipline is to keep them in balance.
One of the key practices of fully formed leadership is staying “emotionally fit”, (EF) which is a place of steadiness, peace of mind and joy in your life and work. Emotional fitness has at its core emotional intelligence, referred to as EQ. EQ is knowing and managing your emotions, and also reading other’s emotions and responding well to them.        Emotional fitness takes EQ and builds on it. In fact, It’s the highest form of EQ. You’ll be surprised to learn who emotionally fit leaders are today.

 

Enough is Enough! Why we’re building a game-changing platform in collaboration with Microsoft to help students suffering from addiction, their families, and friends
Flora Nicholas, Founder and CEO, All Sober
Paul Gayter, Founder and Chief Visionary, All Sober
Donald McDonald, Chief Recovery Officer, All Sober
Rory Pullens, Chief Education & Inspiration Officer, All Sober
There are 192 million Americans who are impacted by addiction daily — and there are millions of college students and their families and friends among them. However, as people try to get sober, and loved ones attempt to help, they face problems at every stage of the recovery process and beyond. Solutions are currently siloed, fragmented, highly specialized, not available on the scale that the problem demands, or simply non-existent.
Flora and Paul will share their experience of trying to help a loved one, talk about the barriers that they faced along the way and tell you why they came to say “Enough is enough!”, and created All Sober as a result.
They will also tell you how they involved one of the biggest companies in the world, Microsoft, to help them bring All Sober to life and make a difference in the lives of all those who need help.
During the session, Flora and Paul will give a live platform demo and show how All Sober will provide everything people need for recovery and sober life all in one place. Donald, who is a person in recovery himself, will talk about how the platform will help all those who are walking in his footsteps. And because collegiate recovery programs are more important than ever, Rory will discuss how All Sober can become an integral and hugely beneficial part of your college recovery programs.
And of course, the team will also answer all your questions.

 

A Family Problem Requires a Family Solution: How Families are Affected by Addiction, and what to do about it
Sherry Gaugler-Stewart, Director of Family and Spiritual Recovery, The Retreat
When a loved one struggles with addiction families tend to focus their energy and attention on getting that person well. Most believe that if their loved one finds help, then everyone else will be okay. Many family members can see the negative impact and consequences of addiction on their loved ones, but find it difficult to see the depth of how they’ve been affected. If families aren’t getting support for themselves, the fear that they’ve had about their loved one finding recovery often becomes fear about whether or not their loved one will maintain it. Without an understanding of the disease, families often end up reacting as they did when their loved one was still in active addiction.
Navigating Virtual Spaces: A Comprehensive Approach for Delivering AOD Prevention and Recovery Support Initiatives
Laura M Longo, Ph.D., University at Albany – SUNY
Natalie Sumski, University at Albany – SUNY
Evan Ozmat, University at Albany – SUNY
This presentation will focus on strategies that alcohol and other drug prevention and collegiate recovery professionals can utilize to transition their work into the virtual space. We will discuss strategies to support the design, implementation, accessibility, and evaluation of online AOD prevention and collegiate recovery programming. Additionally, we will share findings from two focus groups that informed virtual prevention programming efforts at one large northeastern university. We will also discuss specific ways the shift to a virtual environment impacts student in recovery, strategies for hosting and engaging students in virtual recovery spaces, and ways to continue building capacity in Collegiate Recovery Programs in the virtual environment. Attendees will have opportunities to participate, ask questions, and consider application to their own campuses.

 

Integrating Multiple Pathways to Recovery in a Collegiate Recovery Community; Lived Experiences of Students
Ryan J. Minieri, Graduate Student at Montclair State University
Caleb Knight, Undergraduate Student at Montclair State University
Conor Hogan, Graduate Student at Montclair State University
Jean-Marie Beeks, Undergraduate Student at Montclair State University
Alison “Al” Fryer, Undergraduate Student at Montclair State University
Melaney Moffitt, Graduate Student at Montclair State University
This program will allow panelists and the moderator to discuss each of their pathways to recovery and how they pursue recovery today. They will share about their introduction to recovery and what types of programs have worked best for them and why. As the panelists approach recovery differently, the audience will be able to examine recovery from multiple lenses. The panelists are all members of the Red Hawk Recovery program at Montclair State University in New Jersey. They will discuss how they respect, appreciate, and interface while engaging in multiple pathways to recovery, what they have learned from different perspectives of recovery, and how they support one another’s individualized approaches to recovery. Attendees will learn the benefits of welcoming multiple pathways to recovery in their respective recovery communities and will learn how to integrate inclusivity into their recovery programming.
Collegiate Recovery Programs: Helping College Students in Recovery Succeed
Bruce J. Reed, PhD, CRC, LCDC, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Saara Grizzell, PhD, CRC, LCDC, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Kristine Gonzalez, MA, LPC-Associate, LCDC-Intern
College recovery services are designed to provide necessary supports for college students with issues related to substance use disorders to be successful in post-secondary education. However, as a still emerging form of student supports, major issues remain such as funding, the utilization of evidence-based interventions, effective program evaluations, and the need for more empirical research. This presentation provides a historical overview of Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) and an examination of current issues facing the field; it concludes with recommendations for program administrators, researchers, and rehabilitation counselors.

 

Collegiate Recovery Awards: Individual Celebration 6:00pm – 6:30pm EST
The 2021 Collegiate Recovery Awards recognizes staff, students, and other supporters who have gone above and beyond as members of the collegiate recovery field and movement. We celebrate all awardees throughout #ARHE2021 in a variety of ways. Join this session for an individual celebration for the awardee above!
Collegiate Recovery Awards: Individual Celebration 6:30pm – 7:00pm EST
The 2021 Collegiate Recovery Awards recognizes staff, students, and other supporters who have gone above and beyond as members of the collegiate recovery field and movement. We celebrate all awardees throughout #ARHE2021 in a variety of ways. Join this session for an individual celebration for the awardee above!
Collegiate Recovery Awards: Individual Celebration 7:00pm – 7:30pm EST
The 2021 Collegiate Recovery Awards recognizes staff, students, and other supporters who have gone above and beyond as members of the collegiate recovery field and movement. We celebrate all awardees throughout #ARHE2021 in a variety of ways. Join this session for an individual celebration for the awardee above!
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